Daniel Castro

Daniel Castro
Vice President, ITIF, and Director, Center for Data Innovation
Phone: 
202-626-5742

Daniel Castro is vice president at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) and director of ITIF's Center for Data Innovation.

Castro writes and speaks on a variety of issues related to information technology and internet policy, including privacy, security, intellectual property, Internet governance, e-government, and accessibility for people with disabilities. His work has been quoted and cited in numerous media outlets, including The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, USA Today, Bloomberg News, and Bloomberg Businessweek. In 2013, Castro was named to FedScoop’s list of the “top 25 most influential people under 40 in government and tech.” In 2015, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker appointed Castro to the Commerce Data Advisory Council.

Castro previously worked as an IT analyst at the Government Accountability Office (GAO) where he audited IT security and management controls at various government agencies. He contributed to GAO reports on the state of information security at a variety of federal agencies, including the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. In addition, Castro was a visiting scientist at the Software Engineering Institute in Pittsburgh, PA, where he developed virtual training simulations to provide clients with hands-on training of the latest information security tools.

He has a B.S. in foreign service from Georgetown University and an M.S. in information security technology and management from Carnegie Mellon University.

 

Recent Publications

April 7, 2020

The Pirate Bay (TPB), the most notorious online platform for disseminating copyright-infringing files, recently regained its spot as the world’s top torrent site. The platform’s stubborn 17-year existence shows how much work policymakers have left to do in order to curb illegal access to digital content, even though in the case of TPB the work is as simple as mandating Internet service providers to block it.

April 6, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed gaps in society’s digital readiness for social distancing. If policymakers seize the opportunity to address these gaps, they can make it easier to manage the next pandemic while providing significant long-term social and economic benefits.

April 1, 2020

The most important public health intervention—social distancing—will be unsustainable without a major investment in digital preparedness.

March 13, 2020

Any stimulus package should include measures to spur technology deployment that would not just boost the economy, but also, in some cases, help society become more resilient so that we are better able to cope with future pandemics, which are all but inevitable.

March 2, 2020

Cyberattacks are on the rise at all levels of government, but many small jurisdictions do not have the resources to protect themselves. Their vulnerability affects states and the federal government, who must pitch in.

February 23, 2020

The most common facial-recognition applications are benign—and Fourth Amendment protections, coupled with deeply held views about civil liberties, put limits on what government can do.

January 28, 2020

When it comes to sharing personal information, most of us are what the renowned privacy scholar Alan Westin called “privacy pragmatists”—we appreciate the value and convenience that today’s technological innovations offer, and we make decisions about which services we want to use and which transactions we want to engage in based on the costs and benefits of each opportunity.

January 27, 2020

A close look at data from a new NIST report reveals that the best facial recognition algorithms in the world are highly accurate and have vanishingly small differences in their rates of false-positive or false-negative readings across demographic groups.

January 13, 2020

The eCommerce Directive—a critical building block of the EU’s digital economy—is in need of modernization, but updates should continue to remove obstacles to online commerce and provide legal certainty to businesses and citizens.

January 13, 2020

The past year has seen a remarkable rise in the quality and quantity of deepfakes — realistic-looking images and videos produced with artificial intelligence that portray someone doing or saying something that never actually happened, such as Nixon delivering an alternate moon landing speech.

December 19, 2019

The early designers of the Internet quickly realized that as the number of domain names flourished, there was a need for tracking domain name owners to resolve questions and conflicts that might ar

December 16, 2019

Policymakers should seek to maximize the benefits of Internet openness while maintaining carefully designed guardrails that reduce the Internet’s most clearly harmful uses.

Recent Events and Presentations

April 15, 2020

Modern government websites should be fast, secure, and reliable. Unfortunately, over half of state unemployment insurance websites crashed in the past few weeks as Americans went online to apply for benefits. Join ITIF for a video webinar to discuss initial lessons learned and best practices for building modern e-government solutions.

April 9, 2020

ITIF hosted a video webinar to discuss the implications of the pandemic on society, industry, and individuals and what organizations and governments need to do to cope.

April 1, 2020

ITIF hosted a video webinar where panelists offered different perspectives about how policymakers should strike the right balance on privacy, both during and after a pandemic.

March 12, 2020

ITIF hosted a panel discussion about the emerging trends in the spread of deepfakes, the capabilities of the technology, and the opportunities available for the public and private sector to respond to these challenges.

December 5, 2019

ITIF hosted a conversation about the potential applications of facial recognition technology, industry best practices in the use of the technology, and policies that spur innovation and deployment while preserving privacy and security.

September 10, 2019

ITIF's Center for Data Innovation hosted a keynote address by Michael Kratsios, Chief Technology Officer of the United States, and a panel discussion on the state of the global AI race and how policymakers can continue to support U.S. leadership in AI.

July 24, 2019

ITIF hosted a discussion about the benefits of using facial recognition for law enforcement and public safety, the current safeguards in place that govern its use, and the opportunities for policymakers to address legitimate concerns without limiting the potential of this technology.

March 27, 2019

From data breaches to denial of service attacks, the private sector routinely faces a barrage of threats from those seeking to wreak havoc on their digital systems. When faced with an attack, companies can take steps to secure their own systems, but they are not authorized to retaliate against any system that they do not own. What are the domestic and international implications of authorizing private entities to engage in offensive cybersecurity operations?

December 4, 2018

While many nations have developed national strategies to support the development and adoption of AI, the United States has not. Join ITIF's Center for Data Innovation for the release of a new report laying out a detailed national AI strategy and a panel discussion about the ways in which policymakers can make the United States more competitive in the global AI race.

September 25, 2018

The European Union’s new privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), went into effect on May 25, 2018. Pressure is mounting for lawmakers to take a position.

June 28, 2018

ITIF and the Fourth Amendment Advisory Committee hosted an expert panel discussion on how policymakers can protect consumer and business access to encryption and put in place policies that both encourage advances in cryptography and protect the rule of law.

May 22, 2018

Join the Center for Data Innovation for a presentation of its new report and a panel discussion on how policymakers can hold algorithms accountable while accelerating adoption of AI.