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Hamilton Center on Industrial Strategy

Hamilton Center on Industrial Strategy

ITIF’s Hamilton Center promotes a practical approach to competitiveness policy that enables U.S. technology leadership in global markets. The Hamiltonian agenda entails more than just increasing economic inputs and factor conditions that are broadly conducive to innovation and growth. Policies must directly enable firms in America to lead in advanced technologies and industries that are strategically important for economic and national security... (More.)

Featured Publications

National Developmentalism: The Alternative to Neoliberalism and Neo-New Dealism

National Developmentalism: The Alternative to Neoliberalism and Neo-New Dealism

Neoliberalism’s deficiencies are clear. To address the challenges America now faces, policymakers should adopt the doctrine of national developmentalism and not allow economic policy to swing back toward a revised New Dealism, as it is now doing.

The Hamilton Index, 2023: China Is Running Away With Strategic Industries

The Hamilton Index, 2023: China Is Running Away With Strategic Industries

China now dominates the strategically important industries in ITIF’s Hamilton Index, producing more than any other nation in absolute terms and more than all but a few others in relative terms. Its gains are coming at the expense of the United States and other G7 and OECD economies, and time is running short for policymakers to mount an industrial comeback.

Speed Up America, Slow Down China, or Both? The Key Strategic Question for the 21st Century

Speed Up America, Slow Down China, or Both? The Key Strategic Question for the 21st Century

The reality is that if America does not do both—speed itself up, and slow China down—then it will likely lose the techno-economic race in the advanced, traded-sector industries that are most strategically important for the country’s dual-use industrial base and national security.

The Global Battle Over Advanced Industries

The Global Battle Over Advanced Industries

If the United States is to win the techno-economic battle instigated by China, trade policy must prioritize global market access for high-fixed-cost advanced industries such as aerospace, biopharmaceuticals, semiconductors, and software.

Time for Competitive Realism

Time for Competitive Realism

U.S. foreign policy doctrine subordinates the goal of maintaining, let alone maximizing, America’s global power advantage. That formula will not succeed against the new China challenge.

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Events

October 24, 2023

Securing Our Future: A Framework for Critical Technology Assessment

Please join ITIF, The Hamilton Project at Brookings, and the National Network for Critical Technology Assessment in a press release and showcase event launching the release of the report, Securing America’s Future: A Framework for Critical Technology Assessment.

April 27, 2023

Reviving America’s Hamiltonian Tradition to Win the Economic Competition With China

Please join ITIF for an all-day conference with leading experts and policymakers to explore why and how Washington can look to Hamiltonianism for guidance in how to win the techno-economic contest with China.

November 28, 2022

How Updating a Century-Old Trade Law Could Limit China’s Ability to Profit From Unfair Trade Practices

Watch ITIF's briefing event featuring Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) and an expert panel of current and former U.S. trade officials who discussed how to limit China’s ability to profit from its predatory trade practices.

September 15, 2022

A New Frontier: Leveraging U.S. High-Performance Computing Leadership in an Exascale Era

Watch ITIF's event at the Dirksen Senate Office Building (SD-562) as it released a new report exploring the promise of HPC in the exascale era, examining some of the latest cutting-edge applications of HPC, and articulating steps policymakers should take to keep the United States at the leading-edge of this highly globally competitive, yet truly foundational information technology.

January 11, 2022

What a National Strategic-Industry Policy Should Look Like

ITIF hosted a discussion of what a robust national strategic-industry policy should—and should not—entail.

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Staff

Robert D. Atkinson
Robert D. Atkinson

President

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

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Stephen Ezell
Stephen Ezell

Vice President, Global Innovation Policy, and Director, Center for Life Sciences Innovation

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

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Advisors

David Adler
David Adler

Economics Author

“Inside Operation Warp Speed: A New Model for Industrial Policy”

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Ben Armstrong
Ben Armstrong

Research Scientist

MIT Industrial Performance Center

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William B. Bonvillian
William B. Bonvillian

Former Director

MIT Washington Office

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Michael Brown
Michael Brown

Partner

Shield Capital

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Erica Fuchs
Erica Fuchs

Professor, Engineering and Public Policy

Carnegie Mellon University

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Rosabeth Moss Kanter
Rosabeth Moss Kanter

Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor of Business Administration

Harvard Business School

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Sridhar Kota
Sridhar Kota

Herrick Professor of Engineering

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

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Brad Markell
Brad Markell

Executive Director

AFL-CIO Industrial Union Council

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Jack Shanahan
Jack Shanahan

Lieutenant General, Retired.

United States Air Force

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Willy C. Shih
Willy C. Shih

Professor of Management Practice

Harvard Business School

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Carroll Thomas
Carroll Thomas

Director

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

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More From the Center

April 5, 2024|Op-Eds & Contributed Articles

A Transatlantic G2 Against Chinese Technology Dominance

Alone, America cannot stem Beijing’s rise in advanced industries. We need a new pact with Europe. Its objective should be to refuse to surrender to technological domination by the CCP. Being pioneers of the green transition will not be enough.

March 11, 2024|Reports & Briefings

How Innovative Is China in the Robotics Industry?

China does not yet appear to be leading in robotic innovation, but its domestic production and adoption are growing rapidly, and the Chinese government has prioritized the industry. It is likely only a matter of time before Chinese robotics companies catch up to the leading edge.

February 23, 2024|Op-Eds & Contributed Articles

How to Win the Economic War With China

It’s time to move from an Economic Statecraft 1.0 premised on using U.S. strength to support friends and punish adversaries, to an Economic Statecraft 2.0 premised on husbanding U.S. strength while limiting the relative techno-economic advance of China.

February 21, 2024|Blogs

Boeing Is Too Important to Fail

Any regulatory responses to the recent door-panel failure need to be considered and proportionate, advancing safety while also factoring in the country’s strategic competitiveness.

February 16, 2024|Op-Eds & Contributed Articles

The Case for National Developmentalism

National developmentalism is a third alternative to neoliberalism and neo-New Dealism, according to Robert Atkinson's piece in The Liberal Patriot.

January 25, 2024|Blogs

The Real “Reality” of America’s Deindustrializing Economy

A recent CATO report takes liberties with statistics to deny U.S. manufacturing is in decline. But the facts remain: It is. It matters. And we need an industrial policy strategy to address it.

December 4, 2023|Blogs

NSF’s Technology Innovation Partnership Should Offer Grants for Universities to Establish Industrial Policy Programs

The United States is essentially defenseless against the kind of mercantilist aggression it now faces from China. Congress should respond by funding university programs and career training programs that focus on economic warfighting, which is distinct from learning about foreign affairs, economics, or military affairs.

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