Skills and Future of Work

As schools embark on a year of virtual or hybrid learning, hackers are seeking to exploit weaknesses in systems largely unprepared to fend off attacks. States must take the lead by updating technology and training users.
Skills and Future of Work
Check a box to narrow search for individual content items that cover numerous issues.
October 21, 2010
Rob Atkinson gave the Keynote Presentation at the Kansas Economic Policy Conference.
July 29, 2010
D.C. public schools are right to explore merit-based pay for teachers.
July 1, 2010
Are American's colleges really preparing graduates for the modern economy?
June 10, 2010
A new study shows H-1B visas for foreign professionals actually promote U.S. high tech employment.
November 15, 2009
Rob Atkinson describes how better data needs to be available on America's colleges and universities.
October 7, 2009
American universities play an important role in spurring technological innovation, job creation and U.S. economic competitiveness. But they can do more, especially if the federal government makes a more concerted effort to help universities commercialize and transfer new technologies.
July 16, 2009
Please join us for a discussion of a new ITIF report, How IT Can Enable 21st Century Schools with the report authors, Tim McDonald and Curtis Johnson of the Education|Evolving. The authors will discuss why the existing school reform movement has stalled, how information technology can enable the emergence of fundamentally new kinds of schools.
July 16, 2009
In a new ITIF report, How IT Can Enable 21st Century Schools Tim McDonald and Ted Kolderie of the Education|Evolving, discuss why the existing school reform movement has stalled and how information technology (including computers, software and communications) can enable the emergence of fundamentally new kinds of schools
May 21, 2009
Please join ITIF to discuss how “Fiber to the Library” (FTTL), as a national spearhead deployment project, could quickly deliver access to next-generation broadband.
October 29, 2008
This blog post reviews findings of a recent academic study on the low numbers of women in advanced mathematics programs, citing a need “to make math cool again” to spur U.S. competitiveness, because now doing mathematics for fun is “deemed uncool within the social context of USA middle and high schools…and can lead to social ostracism.”

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