Joshua Meltzer

Joshua Meltzer
Fellow
Global Economy and Development at the Brookings Institution

Dr. Joshua Meltzer is a fellow in Global Economy and Development at the Brookings Institution and an adjunct professor at the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies and at Georgetown Law School. Dr. Meltzer is also a reviewer for the Journal of Politics and Law. His work focuses on international trade law and policy issues relating to the World Trade Organization (WTO) and Free Trade Agreements.

Dr. Meltzer’s research also includes the intersection between climate change and international trade and the role of trade policy in supporting access to the internet and cross-border data flows. He also writes on global governance issues with a focus on the legitimacy of the WTO and other international economic bodies such as the G-20.

Dr. Meltzer has been published in several peer reviewed law and policy journals and has also testified on international trade issues before Congress and the United States International Trade Commission.

A regular commentator in international print media, Dr. Meltzer has been interviewed by the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Financial Times, Asahi Shimbun and in global newswires, including Bloomberg News and Thomson Reuters. He has also appeared on television news media outlets, including BBC, CNN and Fox News.

Prior to joining Brookings, Dr. Meltzer was a trade negotiator and legal advisor with the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. He was also posted as a diplomat to the Australian Embassy in Washington D.C. where he was responsible for trade and climate change issues. Dr. Meltzer has an S.J.D. and L.L.M from the University of Michigan Law School, Anne Arbor and law and commerce degrees from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

Recent Events and Presentations

February 11, 2015

Join ITIF for a conversation with an expert panel about the evolution of trade policy and economics.

July 24, 2013

This event will explore both the short-term and long-term impacts of PRISM on digital trade issues and discuss how policymakers should respond to protect both U.S. economic interests and digital free trade.