Caleb Foote

Caleb Foote
Research Assistant
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Caleb Foote is a research assistant at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation. Prior to joining ITIF, Caleb graduated from Brown University with a concentration in Economics. He previously interned for TechHelp and serves as a trustee of the American Parliamentary Debate Association.

Recent Publications

May 26, 2020

The changing rate of technological advancement is a large source of controversy, with fears of both acceleration and stagnation. A new paper has sought to examine more granularly where this growth is occurring, identifying 1,757 technology domains and assessing the importance of new patents in those domains from 1976 to 2015.

May 18, 2020

Digital technology adoption has spread rapidly through the economy, revolutionizing many processes. A new study examines how this change has taken place, interviewing 1,700 companies across the United States and European Union.

May 11, 2020

The automation of manufacturing industries is a major public concern due to the salience of layoffs that are directly attributed to robot adoption. But closer analysis of automation’s impacts generally reveals that these fears are overblown.

May 4, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) is widely considered to have the potential to dramatically re-shape industries throughout the economy, which creates incentives for companies to conceal their research. Despite this, a new study posits that AI science and technology are deeply linked, with academic papers spurring industrial applications and vice versa.

April 27, 2020

Public research institutes (PRIs) are government-owned non-academic centers designed to collaborate with other research groups. They are a key complement to firms’ own R&D investments, although they are often overshadowed.

April 20, 2020

Emigration, especially of high-skilled workers, is often presumed to be a major problem for developing nations. However, emigrants can drive innovation in their home country by driving up the costs of wages, and thus the returns to labor-saving inventions. A new study supports this idea, comparing the rates of emigration and patenting between communities in Sweden in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

April 20, 2020

Assuming that the “shovel readiness” of investments are the same, policymakers are better off investing in areas that also boost long-term economic growth.

April 13, 2020

It is commonly assumed that the wealth and other benefits that highly innovative firms produce are concentrated among high-skilled workers, since they are the ones who are most likely to be innovating. But a new study casts doubt on this presumption, using matched employee-employer data from the United Kingdom.

April 6, 2020

In the wake of economic downturns, companies are forced to cut costs, often turning to R&D activities, which have a low impact on short-term revenue. A new study has isolated one of the mechanisms through which this takes place by examining patenting in the years after different kinds of economic crises.

March 30, 2020

It is widely presumed that agglomeration effects cause large cities to have large advantages in the innovative process. A new study tests this presumption by examining the proportion of patents filed in large metropolitan areas from 2000 to 2014 across 14 OECD countries.

March 23, 2020

Demand for H-1B visas, which allow U.S. firms to recruit high-skilled foreign workers, has dramatically exceeded the supply—there were 200,000 applications in 2019 for the 85,000 visas that were available.

March 16, 2020

Broadband availability dramatically changed the nature of job markets, allowing businesses to reach larger pools of qualified applicants, as evidenced by the fact that the percentage of U.S. job seekers who used the Internet for their job searches tripled between 2000 and 2011.