Caleb Foote

Caleb Foote
Research Assistant
Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Caleb Foote is a research assistant at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation. Prior to joining ITIF, Caleb graduated from Brown University with a concentration in Economics. He previously interned for TechHelp and serves as a trustee of the American Parliamentary Debate Association.

Recent Publications

November 18, 2019

The Global Mercantilist Index, ranking 60 nations on 18 variables ranging from market access and forced localization to currency manipulation and intellectual property protections, finds that China is the world’s most innovation-mercantilist nation.

November 18, 2019

Since 2011, the U.S. government has spent over $400 million to provide broadband Internet access to 1.6 million people. A recent study investigated the impact that policies like these can have by examining the construction of broadband infrastructure across China, finding that every 10 percent increase in a region’s infrastructure increased firms’ productivity by 1.1 percent and workers’ wages by 4.2 percent.

November 12, 2019

Ensuring that students are not only capable of using technology, but also of integrating technology into their work is key to providing students with the skills they will need in the modern economy. In 2018, over 46,000 8th graders from 12 developed and developing countries participated in a study of computer and information literacy.

November 4, 2019

R&D tax incentives are key to fostering innovation, effectively providing needed public support for research without sacrificing private-sector market incentives. According to a new report by the OECD, the United States is well behind much of the rest of the world in this respect.

October 28, 2019

The U.S. economy has polarized since 1980, with widening gaps between high- and low-skilled wages driving increased inequality. One study has provided a partial explanation for this trend, identifying that sectors with high “income elasticity” (where demand is more sensitive to changes in income) are more likely to employ both high- and low-skilled workers, but less likely to employ medium-skilled workers.

October 23, 2019

Nearly 25 percent of all R&D expenditures in China come in the form of government subsidies to firms. It would be ideal if China dramatically reduced these innovation subsidies so American workers in innovation industries would face a level playing field, but the chances of that happening are slim to none. It is time for the federal government to step up its game and provide significantly more support for industrial R&D.

October 21, 2019

The United States continues to fall further behind world leaders in funding for university research. To reverse course, it should increase support by $45 billion per year and provide stronger incentives for businesses to increase their investments.

October 21, 2019

In response to increased public pressure, both Congress and the Trump Administration have recently promoted efforts to reduce the price of prescription drugs in the United States. Several other countries have already imposed measures of their own.

October 15, 2019

Innovation can be approximated across many different metrics, which can present very different impressions of where new technologies are being created and utilized. In a new report, the OECD has analyzed the 2,000 companies that invest the most in R&D for their output related to artificial intelligence.

October 7, 2019

U.S. economic data has lagged behind the explosion of the digital economy, preventing researchers from fully understanding the extent of e-commerce and its impact on the broader economy. The Census Bureau is working to remedy this, releasing the first quarterly e-commerce report in August and including services in the annual E-Stats report for the first time in September.

September 30, 2019

As technology changes the nature of jobs, the language we use to describe them changes too. A new study makes use of this phenomenon to analyze a database of 5 million job advertisements that appeared in newspapers from 1940 to 2000, calculating when a job title first came into use.

September 23, 2019

Discussions about job losses from automation tend to assume that innovation will overwhelmingly displace low-skill workers. But this view is misguided because it fails to recognize that low-skill jobs are the least profitable for companies to make obsolete.