News Room

News Clippings

September 11, 2015
InfoWorld writes that ITIF warns, “If the court supports the use of search warrants to obtain data stored abroad, it will feed the perception that the best way to protect data from the prying eyes of the U.S. government is to store it overseas with a non-U.S. provider.... those fears will likely cost U.S. tech companies well over $35 billion by 2016.”
September 10, 2015
“Privacy advocates make outsized claims about the privacy risks associated with new technologies,” said Daniel Castro and Alan McQuinn in the Washington Post.
September 2, 2015
Bloomberg writes, Edward Snowden’s exposure of clandestine data collection by the U.S. - sometimes with industry collaboration - has already cost companies. They could forgo more than $35 billion in sales by 2016 because of doubts about the security of their cloud-based systems, according to ITIF.
September 1, 2015
“The Lifeline program has historically had problems with fraud and abuse,” said Doug Brake in Morning Consult.
August 31, 2015
“The stakes are pretty big, especially in markets that the FCC needs to clear a certain amount of spectrum in order to free up enough for nationwide licenses,” said Doug Brake in The Hill.
August 24, 2015
ITIF stated that the CRS report “paints a rosier picture of U.S. manufacturing than is actually warranted” and warned that U.S. manufacturing has “barely recovered from the Great Recession,” writes IndustryWeek.
August 21, 2015
“IoT allows us to take old problems and apply new solutions to them,” said Daniel Castro in GovLoop. “That’s what makes it so powerful.”
August 19, 2015
“Some countries want to see more censorship online. They want to see more control over who can be online, what they can say. And they see the United States stepping down as an opportunity for them have the internet more to their vision of what it should be,” said Daniel Castro in BuzzFeed.
August 19, 2015
Former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson cited ITIF’s report debunking arguments against high-skilled immigration in an Orlando Sentinel op-ed.
August 13, 2015
Doug Brake noted in Morning Consult that the FCC “previously argued in front of the Supreme Court that it is an information service and so they need to point to changes that justify their prior factual findings.”

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Press Releases

October 26, 2015
Without pioneering new ideas and equipment, innovation and productivity will be stuck in neutral.
October 22, 2015
So-called “dig once” policies can dramatically reduce the cost of deploying broadband Internet infrastructure by taking advantage of the opportunity to install new conduits whenever roads or sewers are under construction, says Doug Brake.
October 19, 2015
The Department of Transportation is trying to improve the safety and security of national airspace—which is a worthy goal—but the United States cannot rush into new rules that could have unintended consequences down the line.
October 19, 2015
ITIF released a new report outlining why Internet marketplace platforms do not need their own, special regulations to address potential competition, privacy, or employment concerns.
October 13, 2015
ITIF released a new analysis on why and how states should better harness IT to drive public-sector productivity and generate savings.
October 9, 2015
Congressman Frank Pallone (D-NJ) spoke clearly at the Duke Law Forum on the Future of Video Competition and Regulation: The FCC should “hit the pause button” on regulating streaming video. This is a sound recommendation, says Doug Brake.
October 6, 2015
Policymakers in the United States and EU should work together swiftly to implement an interim agreement so that we do not shut down transatlantic digital commerce overnight, says Daniel Castro.
October 5, 2015
The BEPS project should not be an excuse for hidden tax increases, nor should it dramatically increase the cost of compliance, says Joe Kennedy.
October 5, 2015
As Congress begins to review this new framework, we implore lawmakers to remember the importance of having a high-standard agreement that sets the bar for all future global trade agreements.
October 2, 2015
Instead of nullifying the Safe Harbor, policymakers in the United States and EU should work together to make a number of much-needed privacy reforms, says Daniel Castro.

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