Productivity

The federal government should significantly increase spending on research and development that specifically targets technologies likely to boost productivity in order to spur growth and reduce the budget deficit.
Productivity
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April 7, 2016
Government leaders should start demanding that IT projects specify how they will improve productivity and hold these projects accountable for delivering the promised value, writes Daniel Castro in Government Technology.
March 15, 2016
The U.S. economy could boost GDP anywhere between $1.6 to $2.2 trillion by 2025 through maximizing ICT use across all sectors, writes John Wu in Innovation Files.
March 4, 2016
Instead of focusing just on increasing technology development in export sectors, writes Rob Atkinson for the Korea Economic Institute of America, Korea should seek to grow by increasing productivity and innovation across its entire economy.
February 26, 2016
There has long been a worry about tech-driven unemployment, but that fear has always been and will continue to be misplaced, writes Rob Atkinson in the BLS Monthly Labor Review.
February 23, 2016
China’s labor productivity grew by a world-best 12 percent from 2000 to 2011, writes John Wu in Innovation Files.
February 16, 2016
In the United Kingdom since 1871, technology consistently creates more jobs than it displaces, writes Adams Nager in Innovation Files.
February 2, 2016
Rob Atkinson refutes an old and pernicious economic idea that technology kills jobs in the Huffington Post.
January 26, 2016
It is time for California to set its expectations for e-government higher, says Rob Atkinson in Capitol Weekly.
January 11, 2016
President Obama’s final State of the Union address serves both as a marker for his last year in office and as a reference point (and foil) for candidates on both sides of the 2016 presidential race.
January 7, 2016
Employment grows faster in occupations that adopt computers more so than occupations that do not, writes John Wu in Innovation Files.

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