Productivity

The federal government should significantly increase spending on research and development that specifically targets technologies likely to boost productivity in order to spur growth and reduce the budget deficit.
Productivity
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January 24, 2008
Construction costs continue to spiral out of control because the industry has not invested in technology, particularly information technology, to boost productivity. At this event, construction industry expert Barry LePatner will discuss how to fix the problem, including how information technology can play a key role in lowering construction costs and what the federal government can do to help.
November 7, 2007
After a long period over which Europe was catching up to the United States in productivity, this trend has reversed. Lower levels of investment in information and communications technology (ICT) and less effective use of existing ICT explain a significant share of the lower rates of productivity growth in the European Union over the last decade when compared to the United States. The report argues that regaining robust productivity growth will be critical for EU nations over the next several decades as they struggle with a myriad of challenges, including an aging population.
June 13, 2007
See video, presentation slides, and other details from ITIF debate to mark the release of new ITIF report.
June 13, 2007
In the last few years many have argued that the middle class has not been receiving its fair share of productivity income growth. As a result, the focus of many, particularly those on the left, has shifted from promoting productivity growth to redistribution as a way to raise living standards for this group of Americans. A new ITIF paper examines carefully the trends over the last 25 years in income growth and finds that, contrary to the conventional explanation embraced by many on the left, the historical link between productivity growth and wage growth is not broken and it would be a grave mistake for our future if our nation gave up on growth and the policies that can spur it.
March 13, 2007
This report examines the impact of IT in five key areas: 1) productivity; 2) employment; 3) more efficient markets; 4) higher quality goods and services; and 5) innovation and new products and services.

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