E-Government

In a column for Government Technology Magazine, Daniel Castro outlines the steps state and local governments can take to ensure the businesses in their jurisdictions fully benefit from the transition to an AI economy.
E-Government
Check a box to narrow search for individual content items that cover numerous issues.
May 26, 2009
ITIF proposes a new framework for the use of persistent cookies on government websites given the current trends in e-government.
February 2, 2009
An emerging third wave of e-government is making it possible for governments to solve pressing public problems in fundamentally new ways.
October 31, 2008
In the October 2008 issue of the "Communications of the ACM," ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro debates the merits of paper-trails with activist David Dill.
October 1, 2008
This report shows how IT is the key enabler of many of today’s key improvements in our lives and society—from better education and health care, to a more energy-efficient environment.
April 11, 2008
The United States is one of the few nations not allowing its citizens to submit their census forms online.
March 6, 2008
At this event, the lead scientists of two of the most innovative voting systems unveil their research and provide attendees the opportunity to participate in hands-on demonstrations of their technology.
February 1, 2008
ITIF analyzes the decision made by the Census Bureau to eliminate the Internet response option and concludes that allowing respondents to submit their survey online would have saved taxpayers' money.
December 11, 2007
A statement by ITIF Senior Analyst Daniel Castro to the Election Assistance Commission (EAC) on the importance of innovation in improving our voting technology.
September 18, 2007
A briefing event to unveil the new ITIF report featuring presentations from Robert Atkinson, President of ITIF, and Daniel Castro, Senior Analyst with ITIF. See details and video from the event.
September 18, 2007
ITIF analyzes arguments made by proponents of paper audit trails and debunks the myth that paper audit trails will secure our elections.

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