E-Government

States should ensure e-government services are available to all by making their websites more accessible for people with disabilities, Daniel Castro writes for Government Technology.
E-Government
Check a box to narrow search for individual content items that cover numerous issues.
November 16, 2016
ITIF offers a set of actionable proposals to spur innovation, productivity, and competitiveness that the Trump administration can accomplish in its first year.
October 18, 2016
Just as it would not make sense to only fund bridges and highways in one city in the United States, it makes no sense to limit investment in the sensors, systems, and networks needed to build smart cities to a single location, writes Daniel Castro in Government Technology.
September 2, 2016
Policymakers must recognize the importance of open data as a public resource, writes Daniel Castro in Government Technology.
July 13, 2016
Policymakers can improve people’s lives by strategically framing decisions to direct them toward a preferred outcome, writes Daniel Castro in Government Technology.
June 2, 2016
ITIF’s Center for Data Innovation filed comments with the National Telecommunication and Information Administration on the Internet of Things.
May 31, 2016
State legislators step back from a bill that would limit such technology and instead take a reasonable approach. This should serve as a model for state legislators considering regulation for other emerging technologies, writes Daniel Castro in Government Technology.
April 7, 2016
Government leaders should start demanding that IT projects specify how they will improve productivity and hold these projects accountable for delivering the promised value, writes Daniel Castro in Government Technology.
March 8, 2016
As government agencies try to use databases to solve serious policy issues, they find themselves fighting political battles rather than technological ones, writes Daniel Castro in Government Technology.
January 26, 2016
It is time for California to set its expectations for e-government higher, says Rob Atkinson in Capitol Weekly.
January 21, 2016
By ending the requirement to use a proprietary tracking system for federal contractors, the U.S. government is taking a critical step toward making its spending data more open and accessible, writes Joshua New in Nextgov.

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