Innovation Files

March 15, 2017
Providing universities in developing countries greater access to scientific journals increases publications by 43 percent, writes John Wu in Innovation Files.
March 13, 2017
The CIA and other intelligence agencies should commit to responsibly disclosing vulnerabilities it discovers to the private sector so that security holes can be patched, writes Daniel Castro in Innovation Files.
March 10, 2017
Regulatory agencies face an avalanche of innovative products, but they are more ready than they think to evaluate them, writes Val Giddings in Innovation Files.
March 9, 2017
Innovation and the property rights that secure it are key to meeting global health problems, write Stephen Ezell and Mark Schultz.
March 7, 2017
Trade improves productivity in manufacturing supply chains, as seen in recent empirical evidence from Vietnam, writes John Wu in Innovation Files.
March 2, 2017
Last week ITIF released a report that explores how the media has portrayed technology’s impact on society over the past 30 years and finds that the tone of coverage has turned notably more pessimistic over time, writes Daniel Castro in Innovation Files.
February 28, 2017
Companies invest in innovation to be competitive and to ensure their long-term financial success, and in so doing they create jobs and spur productivity, writes John Wu in Innovation Files.
February 21, 2017
In 2014, other OECD countries invested 0.6 percent of their GDPs on active labor market policies, while the United States invested just 0.1 percent of its GDP. Moreover, the United States now invests less than half of what it did 30 years ago on such programs as a share of GDP, writes Stephen Ezell in Innovation Files.
February 17, 2017
It is important that broadband consumers have choice and control over how their data is used, but the overly restrictive defaults imposed by the recent FCC rules come at a real cost to the economy and do not align with an average consumer's best interest, writes Doug Brake in Innovation Files.
February 15, 2017
After analyzing technological change over recessions and across OECD countries, economists find that it wasn't at fault for sluggish employment growth in the United States post-Great Recession, writes John Wu in Innovation Files.

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