Blogs & Op-eds

August 15, 2018
Vietnam's cybersecurity law is the latest illustration of a growing trend toward using broad definitions of national security and the public interest to justify data protection rules that amount to digital protectionism, Nigel Cory writes for Nikkei Asian Review.
August 10, 2018
The Trump administration is proposing to freeze federal fuel-efficiency standards for passenger vehicles on the theory that weaker regulation will help domestic carmakers. But, as David Hart writes for the Detroit Free Press, it would instead lock the United States into a dirtier, increasingly out-of-touch status quo.
August 7, 2018
As Alan McQuinn writes for InsideSources, data is not like cash, and enacting laws and regulations based on this misconception would both harm America’s digital economy and consumers.
August 7, 2018
Policymakers are free to question U.S. foreign policy towards China, but they do U.S. interests no favors by attacking U.S. companies that merely follow the course charted out by their own trade policies writes Daniel Castro in Innovation Files.
August 3, 2018
As David Hart writes for Morning Consult, the new Environmental Protection Agency administrator, Andrew Wheeler, has an opportunity to pursue the agency’s objectives in a more sophisticated way: using regulation to stimulate technological innovation.
August 1, 2018
In commentary for Fortune Magazine, Joshua New calls on policymakers to adopt a national strategy to promote artificial intelligence based on the principle of algorithmic accountability.
July 30, 2018
Banning law enforcement from using facial recognition technology would be wholly inappropriate based on the evidence to date and limit many beneficial uses of the technology for public safety writes Daniel Castro and Michael McLaughlin.
July 26, 2018
In an opinion piece for TechCrunch, Joshua New writes that algorithmic accountability offers a path toward ensuring organizations use AI responsibly so that it can truly be a boon to society.
July 26, 2018
China is marching toward global technological, economic, and military leadership. Who was responsible for letting this happen? In an opinion piece for National Review, Rob Atkinson explains how pretty much everyone—from successive U.S. administrations and the Washington trade and economics establishment to China itself—is at fault.
July 26, 2018
The Internet economy requires new rules in some cases. But these rules need to be carefully considered. Where changes are needed, policymakers need to ensure that they do not impair the tremendous innovation and value that the Internet has enabled writes Joe Kennedy in Innovation Files.

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