Surveillance Cameras: Helpful or Harmful?

May 15, 2013

WASHINGTON (May 9, 2013) - Surveillance video technology, from speed cameras to building monitoring systems, is becoming ubiquitous on American streets and neighborhoods. Privacy and civil libertarian groups have criticized the use of these technologies as an unjust intrusion on the privacy of law-abiding citizens, while supporters argue surveillance cameras are a valuable tool for law enforcement and serve as a criminal deterrent.
The Information Technology and Information Foundation (ITIF) will examine the ethical, legal and political ramifications of surveillance camera use and discuss potential policy reforms that can enhance the positive impacts of the technology while mitigating negative consequences. The panel discussion will be held from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM, Wednesday, May 22 at ITIF, 1101 K Street NW, Suite 610 A.
"Surveillance video has been essential in numerous criminal investigations, most recently in the hunt for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects," notes Daniel Castro, Senior Analyst at ITIF. "However, the use of this technology does need to be closely monitored to ensure that privacy is protected and the safety benefits are realized. Through this event we hope to highlight the main policy questions regarding camera use and analyze how governments can balance the goals of public safety and personal liberty."
The event will be moderated by Carrie Johnson, Justice Correspondent for National Public Radio. Participants include Paul Rosenberg, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy in the Department of Homeland Security, Jay Stanley, Senior Policy Analyst for the American Civil Liberties Union, and Julian Sanchez, Research Fellow with the Cato Institute. 
To learn more about the event or to register visit, http://www.itif.org/events/surveillance-cameras-helpful-or-harmful.
 
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The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) is a non-partisan think tank whose mission is to formulate and promote public policies to advance technological innovation and productivity internationally, in Washington, and in the states. Recognizing the vital role of technology in ensuring prosperity, ITIF focuses on innovation, productivity, and digital economy issues. Learn more at www.itif.org.

WASHINGTON (May 9, 2013) - Surveillance video technology, from speed cameras to building monitoring systems, is becoming ubiquitous on American streets and neighborhoods. Privacy and civil libertarian groups have criticized the use of these technologies as an unjust intrusion on the privacy of law-abiding citizens, while supporters argue surveillance cameras are a valuable tool for law enforcement and serve as a criminal deterrent.

The Information Technology and Information Foundation (ITIF) will examine the ethical, legal and political ramifications of surveillance camera use and discuss potential policy reforms that can enhance the positive impacts of the technology while mitigating negative consequences. The panel discussion will be held from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM, Wednesday, May 22 at ITIF, 1101 K Street NW, Suite 610 A.

"Surveillance video has been essential in numerous criminal investigations, most recently in the hunt for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects," notes Daniel Castro, Senior Analyst at ITIF. "However, the use of this technology does need to be closely monitored to ensure that privacy is protected and the safety benefits are realized. Through this event we hope to highlight the main policy questions regarding camera use and analyze how governments can balance the goals of public safety and personal liberty."

The event will be moderated by Carrie Johnson, Justice Correspondent for National Public Radio. Participants include Paul Rosenberg, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy in the Department of Homeland Security, Jay Stanley, Senior Policy Analyst for the American Civil Liberties Union, and Julian Sanchez, Research Fellow with the Cato Institute. 

To learn more about the event or to register visit, http://www.itif.org/events/surveillance-cameras-helpful-or-harmful

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The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) is a non-profit, non-partisan think tank whose mission is to formulate and promote public policies to advance technological innovation and productivity internationally, in Washington, and in the states. Recognizing the vital role of technology in ensuring prosperity, ITIF focuses on innovation, productivity, and digital economy issues. Learn more at www.itif.org.