News Room

Press Releases

May 11, 2016
We can no longer simply hope that some R&D funding actually yields economic results.
May 6, 2016
ITIF's Center for Data Innovation and almost 50 other organizations urged congressional action on the bipartisan Open, Permanent, Electronic, and Necessary (OPEN) Government Data Act.
May 4, 2016
ITIF released a new e-book arguing for a sea change in thinking that would make productivity growth the principal goal of economic policy.
April 28, 2016
ITIF urges U.S. policymakers to take decisive steps to ensure the United States continues to be a world leader in high-performance computing.
April 27, 2016
Americans expect that their data will receive Fourth Amendment protections regardless of the means used to store it, and this legislation will help bridge that divide.

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News Clips

May 16, 2016
“Without a clearly articulated goal of transforming traditional infrastructure into digital infrastructure and the right policies to make it happen, this much-needed transition will continue to lag,” said Rob Atkinson in the Wall Street Journal.
May 16, 2016
“Most existing infrastructure will need to be hybridized, by integrating digital features, while some new infrastructure will be purely digital. But make no mistake: The country’s future growth prospects will hinge in no small part on whether it successfully transforms our infrastructure systems,” said Rob Atkinson in POLITICO.
May 6, 2016
Productivity and employment "were never coupled, any more than the divorce rate in Maine and the consumption of margarine (two variables that have moved together),” said Rob Atkinson in Bloomberg View.
May 4, 2016
Fast Company writes that a new report from ITIF says our widespread aversion to government intervention is exactly why the U.S. and many developed countries, like Japan and Korea, are in a productivity rut today—and have been since the Great Recession.
April 28, 2016
“While America is still the world leader, other nations are gaining on us, so the U.S. cannot afford to rest on its laurels,” said Stephen Ezell in the Wall Street Journal. “It is important for policymakers to build on efforts the Obama administration has undertaken to ensure the U.S. does not get out paced.”

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