News Clips

May 21, 2019
“It's really not about the technology, it’s about putting in place rules that govern its use and limit its abuse,” Rob Atkinson told USA Today. “There’s no need to rush into this.”
May 21, 2019
As the Nikkei Asian Review reported, the U.S. Commerce Department's plan to broaden export controls on emerging and foundational technologies in the name of national security could significantly harm the economy. American companies could lose between $14.1 billion and $56.3 billion in export sales over the next five years, with 18,000 to 74,000 jobs threatened, ITIF said in a report
May 21, 2019
As noted by Bloomberg, an ITIF report showed that strict export restrictions on emerging technologies could lead U.S. companies to lose $14.1 billion to $56.3 billion in revenue over five years, threatening as many as 74,000 jobs. The semiconductor industry alone could lose more than 9,000 jobs after a year of 20% tariffs.
May 20, 2019
“We want policies about appropriate use by police,” Daniel Castro told Mercury News. “This should not be about the technology, but how it’s used.”
May 20, 2019
U.S. firms could lose up to $56.3 billion in export sales over five years from stringent export controls on technologies involving Huawei or otherwise, ITIF said in a report. Missed opportunities threatened as many as 74,000 jobs, Reuters noted.
May 17, 2019
“I think there are opportunities for police departments — that are actively trying to improve relations with marginalized communities to address systemic bias in their own procedures and in their own workforce — to use facial recognition to help address some of those problems. I think the tool is neutral in that way. It certainly could be used to exacerbate those problems, but I don’t think it is necessarily going to do that,” Daniel Castro told VentureBeat.
May 14, 2019
Rob Atkinson discussed whether it is time to break up Big Tech with CNN's GPS.
May 14, 2019
“There are plenty of legitimate concerns about government surveillance, but the right approach is to implement safeguards on the use of technology rather than prohibitions,” Daniel Castro told Bloomberg. “Good oversight and proper guidance can ensure that police and other government agencies use facial recognition appropriately.”
May 14, 2019
“It would be a mistake if San Francisco creates a domino effect of other cities following, though I suspect San Francisco is an outlier,” Daniel Castro told Barron's. “There are safeguards to facial recognition in the works, in the form of required warrants to track the location of suspects, and best practices in the use of data.”
May 14, 2019
Critics were silly to compare surveillance usage in the United States with China, given that one country has strong constitutional protections and the other does not, Daniel Castro told the Associated Press. “In reality, San Francisco is more at risk of becoming Cuba than China--a ban on facial recognition will make it frozen in time with outdated technology,” he said.

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